Lufthansa Is Now Offering Free Wifi In First Class (On A Limited Basis)

As far as I’m concerned, Lufthansa and Cathay Pacific are generally the world’s two most consistent airlines in first class. No, not every flight will be the same (as Tiffany and I recently experienced), but I can’t think of any other airlines where virtually nothing about the first class experience has changed in the past decade.

I always know exactly what I’m going to get on Lufthansa, which is nice in terms of managing expectations, but sort of boring from my perspective, since I like to review airlines and experience new things. Anyway, I had heard rumors that Lufthansa was offering free wifi on a limited basis in first class (Travelling The World wrote about it last week).

I didn’t write about it at first because I wasn’t sure how widespread the trial was, and figured that if they’re just testing this on a single route, or something, it’s of very limited use.

Last night I flew from Los Angeles to Munich in first class, and was pleasantly surprised when the purser presented me with a free wifi card shortly after takeoff. I asked her about this, and while she wasn’t sure if it was available on all routes, she said that all her recent flights had this. So it does appear like Lufthansa is offering free wifi in first class on a fairly widespread basis.

Lufthansa has among the most reasonably priced wifi to begin with (wifi for an entire intercontinental flight costs 17EUR with no data caps), though getting it for free is even better. The code can be entered in the “Access Code” section of the wifi log-in page, and works the same way as purchasing a pass for the entire flight.

This is a very nice initiative on the part of Lufthansa, and I hope they make this a permanent feature in first class on all routes.

A lot of people talk about how airlines should make wifi free at least for all first and business class passengers, and some say they should make it available for all passengers. While I certainly agree with the sentiment, the issue is the limited bandwidth available on planes.

So while I don’t want airlines to price outrageously (as Singapore Airlines did on their old A380s), in general I’m all for them charging a reasonable amount for reasonably fast wifi. For example:

  • Emirates used to offer nearly free wifi on their A380s, but it was excruciatingly slow and virtually unusable for anything other than texting, to the point that I couldn’t get any work done
  • Lufthansa lets you buy wifi for 17EUR for an entire intercontinental flight, and the wifi is fast and usable; to me that’s the sweet spot

It’s awesome that Lufthansa has extended this perk to first class passengers, though I imagine the impact on speeds would be significant if they expanded this to business class (not that they’d do that, since they’re presumably having to pay for each of these vouchers that’s used, since the wifi is offered by a third party).

How important is free wifi in a premium cabin to you?

Comments

  1. Good to know, I’m just sorry to see they are constantly reducing First class destinations. Once they phase out their A340-600 fleet, it will be a rare pleasure…

  2. I received a card traveling MUC-PVG on 3/9. Unfortunately the purser forgot to offer it until the end of the flight. He said it’s good 4 a year if I want to hang on to it… Spectacular flight otherwise, all by my lonesome in F.

  3. Turkish has free Wi-Fi for business class (or elite plus passengers in any class). It should be a standard business amenity IMO.

  4. A380 LH 773 BKK-FRA on March 9th was offered free WiFi – and the code was valid for 24hrs – it worked on a connecting flight to Berlin! Now that’s what I call going the extra mile 🙂

  5. @UGC
    Perhaps if they reduce the F sectors then they might be forced to make some improvements to J, because at the moment it’s just plain awful….and wouldn’t be anywhere near the top 29 let alone 1 or 2. I can imagine F passengers leaving in droves if they only had the choice of the bloody miserable sub-par LH J

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