Don’t Miss Out: Last Day For Big Sign-Up Bonuses On Hilton Amex Cards

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Update: The below links for the Hilton Honors™ Surpass® Card from American Express are expired, but you can learn more about best available offers here.

I’ve written about them several times before, though this is one last reminder. The increased sign-up bonuses on the two Hilton Amex cards end tomorrow, Wednesday, October 4, 2017. So if you haven’t yet applied, this is your last chance to do so.

In this post I just wanted to recap the basics of the cards:

Hilton Amex card sign-up bonuses

The two cards have the following sign-up bonuses:

  • The $75 annual fee Hilton Honors™ Surpass® Card from American Express is offering a sign-up bonus of 100,000 Hilton Honors bonus points after spending $3,000 within the first three months, plus a free weekend night certificate on the card’s first anniversary
  • The no annual fee Hilton Honors™ Card from American Express is offering a sign-up bonus of 50,000 Hilton Honors points after spending $1,000 within the first three months, plus a further 25,000 Hilton Honors points after spending another $1,000 within the first six months

These are fantastic sign-up bonuses, especially on the Hilton Honors Surpass Card, which would be my first pick.

Hilton Amex card return on spend

The Hilton Honors™ Surpass® Card from American Express offers 12x points per dollar spent with Hilton, 6x points per dollar spent at U.S. restaurants, U.S. supermarkets, and U.S. gas stations, and 3x points per dollar spent on everything else.

The Hilton Honors™ Card from American Express offers 7x points per dollar spent with Hilton, 5x points per dollar spent at U.S. restaurants, U.S. supermarkets, and U.S. gas stations, and 3x points per dollar spent on everything else.

Hilton Amex card perks

The Hilton Honors™ Surpass® Card from American Express offers Hilton Honors Gold status for as long as you have the card (which is one of the most useful mid-tier statuses) and Diamond status when you spend $40,000 on the card in a year.

The Hilton Honors™ Card from American Express offers Hilton Honors Silver status for as long as you have the card and Gold status when you spend $20,000 on the card in a year.

Both cards also get you access to Amex Offers, which can get you tons of value in terms of discounts on purchases with all kinds of retailers. They also offer 500 bonus Hilton Honors points per booking when you use your card to book and pay for your Hilton stay.

Hilton Amex card eligibility & approval odds

You can potentially quite easily get approved for both of these cards (you’re eligible for the sign-up bonus on each of these cards once in your lifetime) Do keep in mind American Express’ general card application guidelines:

So you could apply for both today, for example. Hopefully one gets approved instantly, and then the next one will likely be put on hold for a few days before being automatically processed. However, as long as you’ve applied for both cards before the deadline, you should be good to go.

Anecdotally I find that this card is extremely easy to be approved for, so assuming you have excellent credit, you shouldn’t have any trouble getting approved for this card. Three of my family members applied during the last promotion, and we all got instantly approved. If you’re an existing cardmember and are denied for the card (which seems unlikely), it typically won’t count against your credit score.

Bottom line

The sign-up bonuses on both the Hilton Honors™ Surpass® Card from American Express and Hilton Honors™ Card from American Express are fantastic. If you haven’t applied for either or both cards, I’d highly recommend doing so today.

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Comments

  1. Any reason why you and other bloggers are ignoring Hilton’s announced change to the fifth night free calculation from last week?

  2. @Mike — Maybe because it is no big deal since it simple math required to conform with the revenue system or variable nightly rates?

  3. @DCS: “Maybe because it is no big deal since it simple math required to conform with the revenue system or variable nightly rates?”

    Other than the fact that this “simple math,” as you put it, is not required to conform with the revenue system, and that the end result is a system that may result in price increases for these awards.

    Then again, you’re not going to ever admit that, so I’m not sure why I bother.

  4. I signed up for the Hilton Surpass card and am trying to decide whether to sign up for the Honors. I have 4 Amex cards and, if I do, it will take my last spot. I can’t cancel any until after February because three are giving me extras on a vacation in that month ..and one is my oldest which I won’t cancel. So trying to decide if I should use up my last spot or hold out for a really good a
    Platinum Amex offer.

  5. @Mike — There is nothing to “admit”. The math is really quite simple. All it does is compute the average award rate over a stay that involves different rates, and then use that rate to calculate the number of points that one gets off for the 5th award night — a practice that was done occasionally even before the switch over to the revenue system, but has become a necessity under the new system because of the highly dynamic rate changes.

    The “old” way of computing the the 5th award night rate is still applicable if daily award rates do not change during a stay. Do you get at least that part? If you do, then you should understand that nothing earth-shattering has happened here. The rates may increase or decrease. It will simply depend on what the daily rates over the 5 nights will be.

  6. @DCS: “There is nothing to “admit”. The math is really quite simple. All it does is compute the average award rate over a stay that involves different rates, and then use that rate to calculate the number of points that one gets off for the 5th award night — a practice that was done occasionally even before the switch over to the revenue system, but has become a necessity under the new system because of the highly dynamic rate changes.”

    Actually, you could start by admitting that you obviously don’t know what the change is, because what you’ve described is the old award calculation for the fifth night free. Last week, Hilton has changed that calculation such that the fifth night is automatically set at zero, irrespective of what the first four nights’ rates are.

    You could also start by admitting that your statement about the math being necessary to deal with the revenue-based system is false, because it’s just an equation, and any equation could be used to calculate the total.

    Again, though, I’m not going to hold my breath.

  7. @Mike — Maybe I have not seen what you are talking about, in which I admit that we were referring to different things.

    I am referring to the T&C:
    “After the 5th Night Free benefit is applied, eligible members will be charged 0 points for the 5th night, 10th night, 15th night, and 20th night of the stay, as applicable. All other nights of the stay will be charged at the applicable full Standard Room Reward price. A standard room is defined by each hotel and subject to availability at participating hotels within the Hilton Portfolio. Applies to Standard Room Reward stays only, not to paid stays or Points & Money Rewards™. Does not apply when stay is booked as part of a Reward Stay offer, package, or promotion offered by Hilton or any of its partners.”

    And to this page: https://goo.gl/nr4Lga
    on the HHonors website titled: “WHAT IS AN EXAMPLE OF HOW THE 5TH NIGHT FREE IS CALCULATED?”

    If you’re talking about something else, then that’s just that: apples and oranges…

  8. @DCS: The terms and conditions reflect the current (new) calculation that took effect last week – the cost for night five is set at zero, and the award is the sum of nights one through four “at the applicable full Standard Room Reward price.”

    The link you provide is the old calculation, which is now irrelevant because the average is now no longer used as of this new change.

    Under the new change, the award cost for the example given on that page will depend on whether the fifth night is a peak night or an off-peak night. If the fifth night of the stay in that example priced at the peak rate of 40,000 points, then the cost of the award would be 140,000 points (or 2 nights at 30,000 and 2 nights at 40,000), and would accordingly reduce the award cost by 4,000 points compared to the old calculation.

    If the fifth night of the stay, however, is the off-peak night priced at 30,000 points, then the cost of the award will increase by 6,000 points over the old calculation, to 150,000 points, because of the elimination of one 30,000 point night (which leaves 3 nights at 40,000 points and 1 night at 30,000 points).

    Translated: If the fifth night is more than the old average, then the new change results in a reduction in the award costs. However, if the fifth night is less than the old average, then the cost of the award will increase when compared to the old calculation.

  9. @Mike — At least there is a legitimate reason for our disagreeing on this. To get ammunition for further disagreements, I need to get up to speed. Could you provide the link to where this new change is described? I must have missed it and if you’re right about the change, I now ADMIT that it should have been covered.

    Thx.

  10. Reading the T&C make it abundantly clear that the cost of awards will increase or decrease, depending on the circumstances, whereas your initial alarmist take was that “…the end result is a system that may result in price increases for these awards.” The inherent feature of the revenue system is that the effect of a programmatic change on award costs will usually follow what cash room rates so as a result. Since these will very likely go up and/or down or be seasonal, so will the award costs….

  11. @DCS: “Reading the T&C make it abundantly clear that the cost of awards will increase or decrease, depending on the circumstances, whereas your initial alarmist take was that ‘…the end result is a system that may result in price increases for these awards.'”

    You’re arguing just for the sake of hearing your own voice again. Give it a rest.

  12. Actually, no. There is a real point in what I wrote, but, yeah, I will give it rest because the point seems to be lost in translation.

    G’day!

  13. @DCS: Your point is that you had to take a factually correct statement and attack it because you are completely incapable of ever admitting that you are wrong.

    You really need to get help.

  14. @Mike sez, cluelessly, as usual: “You really need help”.

    For what purpose do I need help? To add a third Ivy League medical university FULL professorship to my current dual appointments at two such medical universities? To be able to travel more than the 100K miles I am traveling yearly to some of the most coveted locations in world? To be fluent in more than the 5 languages I now speak fluently?

    There is nothing substantive to “admit” here. If you fail to understand the simplest reasoning in my comments, then that is your problem. I do admit when there is something to admit, like above. See it there in capital letters in DCS on October 4, 2017 at 4:04 pm?

    You are garbage, @Mike, for you using the anonymity of the these forums and the web to try to cure yourself of your unmistakable neuroses, psychoses, phobias and insecurities. You are going against the wrong guy here because I study little scrawny guys like you who get online to try to be what you cannot be in real life.

    You want to continue attacking me personally rather than address the substance of my comments? Then fine. Let’s go for it. You’re no longer getting a pass. I am going to hit you back hard for every “narcissist” bullshit you throw at me, until we get banned.

    You’re pure garbage.

  15. Not surprising that you’d believe that you even have a “point.”

    I will hit and hit back hard henceforth since your obsession with me is clearly pathological and you are not likely to quit addressing me, when I seldom address you (tough to tell which “Mike” I address or I would not have addressed you first as I did in this thread).

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