Uber Has Now Rolled Out In-App Tipping In 120+ Cities

A couple of weeks ago Uber announced that they were planning on making some major changes for their drivers, which they referred to as “180 Days Of Change.” This follows their former CEO stepping down, and the company having generally gone from a beloved underdog trying to revolutionize transportation, to a company that many began protesting.

Uber said that they plan on adding in-app tipping in the US, in hopes of helping their drivers earn more money.They initially rolled it out in Seattle, Minneapolis, and Houston, and said that they plan on rolling this out in all US markets by the end of July.

Tech Crunch is reporting that as of today Uber has rolled out in-app tipping in over 120 cities in the US. This includes most major cities, including Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, and many more. However, you may not necessarily notice this immediately:

  • This will be available with the latest version of the app, so you’ll have to make sure you have the latest version of the app
  • Drivers will have to opt-in to accepting tips, so not all drivers will immediately have this enabled

As a reminder, in the app you’ll have the option of adding a $1, $2, or $5 tip, or you can add a custom tip amount. You’ll have up to 30 days to tip. The driver will typically rate you right after a ride (they need to do so before accepting another ride), so hopefully this ends the practice that some drivers have of giving bad ratings to those who don’t tip.

I suspect that most people still won’t tip, though I think this is a step in the right direction, and will hopefully help to start to turn around the culture at the company. Given how creative some drivers have been in soliciting cash tips up until now, I wonder if that’s a practice that may continue, as many drivers probably prefer cash tips.

Do you plan on using Uber’s new in-app tip feature?

Comments

  1. Not happening, not allowing this stupid american nonsense of tipping for everything. want more money ? get a job that pays more.

  2. The whole tipping thing is all wrong in my opinion, how about real living wages for the drivers this would weed out such tipping inflation, which is now an expectation in many cases brought on by minimum wages. Here the solution seems to be from the “bottom up” of “instead top down”. Btw. not only would drivers be happier which such an arrangement, customers would be happier too IMHO.

    Cheers & Safe Travels.

  3. @Jay.

    A lot of jobs that have tips normally have very low standard levels of pay and the employee is expected to make up the extra in tips and he company can then get away with paying a much lower normal wage to them and save themselves money.

    This is why a lot of the time, customer service in America is so much better, because they need the tips, unlike the miserable customer service you get in Europe, because the pay they receive is already made up to minimum wage.

    For example minimum wage is LA is $15 per hour, but tipped employees minimum wage is $10 per hour.

  4. The culture of the company was just fine. Just look at the in-house petition circulating for Travis’ reinstatement.

  5. Americans please stop exporting this tipping culture everywhere. I want everyone to earn a decent wage but it is not me (the consumer) who has to support the salary of the employee !! Increase the price or do whatever you like but stop asking for tips for everything.
    And to those whose argument is tip=better service, look at Japan where the tipping culture literally does not exist and service is excellent. Tip has nothing to do with service from an employee, tip is to help the boss keep wages low, period.

  6. Yea seriously i hate tipping and when i travel to non tipping countries they all seem to expect me to pay tips because of where i am from.

  7. Jay – it depends on the culture. In the US tips are part of the paid service. In other culture, not so much. If you are in a place then it is not the norm then don’t do it. If you are in the US and you don’t tip then you are ripping someone off.

  8. “Not happening, not allowing this stupid american nonsense of tipping for everything. want more money ? get a job that pays more.”

    Yes sounds like typical English travelers you see in USA, India, and everywhere else people work for tips.

    Translation from UK English: “we won’t effing tip you, change your laws” actually means “we want to get drunk as cheaply as possible, couldn’t care less about you as human beings who have bills to pay”

  9. Uber says:
    “they plan on adding in-app tipping in the US, in hopes of helping their drivers earn more money.”

    Easiest solution for that — raise your rates. Problem solved.

    Tipping is appropriate if the driver does something above and beyond the normal.

  10. @James that’s always the argument, sadly it’s not what happens in reality. The link between service received and tip given doesn’t seem to exist in many situations – for example when booking a SuperShuttle from JFK the website asks in advance how much I wish to tip. Given I haven’t yet received the service why would I tip in advance?! Or another example – expectation of $1 per beer for popping a bottle open. Given the average number of drinks served, then even if no hourly wage was given this would still lead to a massive income for merely opening some drinks, which in no way reflects any sort of service. I’ve found service in many European/Australasian countries to be excellent, all without tip being expected.

  11. How much does Uber take per ride? For how much I’ve paid for my last treks around LA, I’m surprised Uber still has drivers. The amount itself is extremely low, and then I assume Uber takes a large chunk out of that… For 1, I love uber and Lyft, since it’s probably a 1/3 the cost of what I used to pay for cabs on the same routes, but I just can’t believe exactly how cheap it is.

    And, for those talking about tipping above… I’m a Californian living in Denmark, and service in the U.S. is 100x better. I obviously haven’t done a study to prove this, but the tipping culture dramatically enhances customer service IMO. I even think it makes customer service in the country overall, even in situations where tips aren’t involved. Want proof, call any customer service line in Denmark and try not to cry in frustration.

  12. @archer528 You are wrong. You can get great service in Japan or Taiwan and no tipping is involved. Maybe the Danes just suck at customer service.

  13. I drive Uber for a living. Soliciting tips is tacky and low class. As a driver I won’t hassle you but if i pick you up or drop you off at the airport and handle your bags then you should tip me . Also tip me around Christmas. Also if you are expensing your Uber ride anyways then you can tip a few bucks. Don’t be a #@$& j#w. You know who you are but I can’t say it because I don’t want to offend the El Al people on here. Millenials don’t tip. Neither do wealthy people from Manhattan Beach or Beverly Hills. The people I usually get tips from are working class people from the inner cities who probably can’t afford to tip anyways.

  14. The tipping culture doesn’t make any sense – that is why people have a problem with it. Why should I waiter giving you a $200 bill at a fancy restaurant get a $40 tip while I waiter giving you a $20 bill at a diner get a $4 tip? It doesn’t make any sense if they both spent exactly the same amount of time with you. Whats the difference between the 2 tips? Because one waiter wore a tie?

    Pay your staff properly. It’s simple. Its why it works in every other country in the world.

  15. archer528 – Interesting, so you tip the people you talk to in call centres? How do you go about doing that?

    I prefer the customer service in Europe to America – pleasant but not absurdly fake with a clearly transparent act in order to solicit bribes.

  16. It’s an interesting proposition. It’s true that America’s tipping culture is out of hand and I’m not enthused by Uber’s move. I try to tip fairly but moderately for normal service, very generously for excellent service. I have noticed sometimes when traveling that service industry people seek out Americans. This can be annoying when they are pesky, but positive when it means their service is outstanding in hopes of a good tip.

  17. I took an Uber ride this morning, tipping didn’t seem to be available for my ride, and I didn’t notice anything in the app highlighting that tipping was coming.

    I wonder if a large percentage of Uber drivers will leave in-app tipping disabled, but continue to encourage cash tipping.

  18. Listen up chaps, I’m going to come to your countries and tip every m*********ing person in sight. $10 for holding the door open, $20 for smiling, and damn it $50 friggin bucks for getting me my food in a timely fashion- and thats just at Mickey D’s, mofos.
    We’ll see if you can suppress tipping culture then!

  19. @Justin H tip you for putting a bag in the trunk? what for? I can carry my own bags. If you grab my bags and put them in the trunk for me, then it doesnt really give me the option now does it?

    Tip you around Christmas? What for? Just because its Christmas? Do you tip your doctors because its Christmas?

    Tip you for picking up or dropping off at an airport? What for? Most drive distances to airport should net you 15-30 bucks easy. Is there extra service provided just because its an airport?

    Cant imagine what you must expect in terms of a tip while you Uber someone to the airport on Christmas while helping them unload their bags….

  20. @Moe
    … wow, you certainly live in your own little narcissistic world, don’t you. Or maybe you just don’t understand English.

    First, he said “if I… handle your bags”… he didn’t say “I’m going to push you down to the sidewalks so that I can load your bags and you better tip me for it”, so if it doesn’t apply to you, you don’t need to open your mouth. But to be honest, I wouldn’t want you to be loading your bags anyways, because you don’t seem the type of person to be considerate, and you’d probably scrape my bumper with your bags as you loaded them. So carry on allowing the drivers to load your bags and not tipping them. What’s the worst they’re gonna do?

    “Do you tip your doctors because it’s Christmas?”
    Okay, while I agree there is no time to “expect” a tip, your comparison of an Uber driver to a doctor is laughable. You may as well have asked “do you tip your president because it’s Christmas?”

    “Tip you for picking up or dropping off at an airport? What for? Most drive distances to airport should net you 15-30 bucks easy.”
    The most incorrect statement of the bunch… not everybody uses your particular airport, so your presumption that the average drive distance to every airport will net the driver 15-30 bucks is way off. In fact, where I live (Sacramento), from downtown to the airport will usually net the driver 10-12 bucks. From my particular place on the outskirts of West Sacramento it would be just under 15. (Cost of 17-22 for the rider minus fees and uber cut)
    –but more importantly than that is that his implication wasn’t that you tip him just for taking you to the airport! He clearly said “drop you off at the airport AND handle your bags”

    So if you’re gonna argue against tips, do it better.

  21. Tipping is a totally disaster culture in the U.S. and it is SPREADING OUT to the entire world. American please stop this!

  22. @Justin H

    “Don’t be a #@$& j#w. You know who you are but I can’t say it because I don’t want to offend the El Al people on here.”

    Your anti-antisemitism is sickening and has no place here. “j#w” and “El Al” aren’t even a dog whistle, you asshole.

    You should stick with your Nazi sites that cater to your worldview. Here: http://bit.ly/2uSZTu8

  23. Uber is a ride SERVICE. The SERVICE industry provides SERVICE with an expectation of tips when SERVICE is good. If you are too CHEAP to tip, SERVE yourself.

  24. What rubbish @ISayItHowISeeIt – they’re being paid a wage to provide a service. If they do something exceptional then fair enough tip them, but if it’s just the service I’d paid for then I’m not paying extra. If Uber want their drivers to earn more then change their fares.

  25. @ Ben – If the waiter at a $200 restaurant is giving you the same service as someone at a $20 restaurant, you are at the wrong place.

    1) Market forces dictate wages.
    2) No one is forced to work a specific job.
    3) Tipping incentivizes good service.

    Furthermore, taking economic advice from Europe is the last thing anyone should do. Western Europe is a museum and nothing else.

  26. I am so tired of tipping in North America, and the notion of having to tip regardless or your service will be affected. Tipping, in my opinion, is if someone does an exceptional job OVER AND ABOVE what you are paid to do… which still does not mean you have to be tipped. There are a lot of other people who do good work that don’t get tipped, like sales clerks, bus drivers, barristas… and they make a minimum wage or close to as well.

    I am very disappointed in this development with Uber as now you have an underlying pressure to tip.

  27. Tipping is the WORST. Catch up with the rest of the world, AMERICA, and abolish this tipping madness.

  28. Basically Uber is a business proposition from the driver to the customer. I will carry you X miles for Y Dollar. Both sides agree on this in advance. Why then change the calculation afterwards. If the driver doesn’t like the price (s)he is at liberty not to take the trip. When too few drivers do, Uber ups the price with a surge. Then the customer can chose to accept or leave it. So simple its beautiful.
    If that is lost, then why user Uber anymore?

  29. Seems like a backwards step for the consumer. If drivers aren’t being paid enough, raise the fares. One of the great strengths of uber is the simplicity and introducing tipping makes it that little bit more complex. I’ll be out of pocket by the same amount regardless.

    Moreover I don’t agree with the notion that tipping improves service. If that were true, then taxis would today offer better service than uber. In my experience at least, that’s not the case.

  30. @Joe
    I can see youre all worked up over this, so lets run through this again….

    Pretty sure I can handle a bag. And if your car is damaged, you can file it with Uber and they can deal with the issue. You’re running on the assumption that people make it their goal to damage your car. Regarding your comment about me not “being the type of person to be considerate”, is tipping a necessity for being considerate? If you dont like your wages, then demand higher minimums and raise the price across the board. Dont bitch about tips.

    “Okay, while I agree there is no time to “expect” a tip, your comparison of an Uber driver to a doctor is laughable. You may as well have asked “do you tip your president because it’s Christmas?”
    Why is it laughable? Do they both not provide a service? Or is it because you dont have a counter-argument? I dont tip my president because he is salaried. He is being paid to do his job, so you’re making my argument for me.

    The most incorrect statement of the bunch… not everybody uses your particular airport, so your presumption that the average drive distance to every airport will net the driver 15-30 bucks is way off. In fact, where I live (Sacramento), from downtown to the airport will usually net the driver 10-12 bucks. From my particular place on the outskirts of West Sacramento it would be just under 15. (Cost of 17-22 for the rider minus fees and uber cut)
    –but more importantly than that is that his implication wasn’t that you tip him just for taking you to the airport! He clearly said “drop you off at the airport AND handle your bags”

    So if you’re gonna argue against tips, do it better.

    You’re right about different geographies and wait times. But again, if the issue is that you’re too close to the airport, then drive farther away from it when you are pulling customers. Its the cost of doing business that you will sometimes break even or take small losses.

    Lastly, if you dont like the returns you get from your job, then consider doing something different. Driving people around is not a skilled job, thus you get paid less. I sympathize with you that you dont get paid enough, but that is a matter for your employer to raise your rates so you get a bigger percentage rather than put the onus on the passenger to subsidize your wages.

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