China Forces Emirates Crews To Remove Taiwanese Flags From Uniforms

Well here’s something that’s sure to be controversial. One of the things that I love about flying with Emirates is how international their cabin crews are. At the beginning of every flight the purser announces how many countries the crew comes from and how many languages they speak, and on an A380 both of those numbers are typically somewhere between 10 and 25.

One of the ways you can identify where a crew member is from is by the pin on their uniform. I think this is a cool feature, and sometimes it turns into a fun conversation starter or guessing game (I’m pretty good with flags, but I’ve had at least a dozen of the flight attendant pins stump me over the years).

That brings me to the point of this post. Up until now Emirates has let cabin crew from Taiwan wear Taiwanese pins, rather than Chinese pins. This will be changing effective immediately. The Chinese government has ordered Emirates employees to remove the Taiwanese pins from their uniforms, under the “One China” policy.

Here’s the email that Emirates’ Uniform Standards and Development Manager sent out to cabin crew regarding this:

Dear All,

We have been instructed by the Chinese Government that with immediate effect, Emirates airline cabin crew are to follow the One China policy. This means you must remove the Taiwanese flag from your service waistcoat and replace it with the Chinese flag.

This must be followed by all Taiwanese crew without exception.

Additional stock of Chinese flags have been ordered and expected to arrive in the coming weeks. You will receive an email when they arrive. In the meantime carry the attached letter to show your seniors why you are not wearing a flag.

Regards,
[Name]
Uniform Standards and Development Manager

emirates-business-class-a380-1

Now, I’m sure there will be very mixed opinions on this, though what I’m most curious about is the Chinese government’s ability to control this. Is this a function of China threatening to cut Emirates’ rights to fly to the country if they don’t agree to this, or what power do they have here? I suspect that the government made this request of Emirates and that the airline didn’t want to do anything to get in their bad graces so they just followed these orders, but it sure makes you wonder where the line would be drawn.

What do you guys make of this situation?

Update: According to reader Jung, crew members were sent a follow-up email regarding this situation that read as follows:

Dear All,

After reviewing your responses to the email below the original request for you to wear a Chinese flag was incorrect and inappropriate.

Please refrain from wearing your Taiwanese flags on flights until further notice. Therefore no flag is required on your uniform.

I do apologize for any upset that I may have caused.

Regards,
Nicola

(Tip of the hat to HK Travel Blog)

Comments

  1. That is crazy. That’s just China pushing around Taiwan which is pretty normal these days.

  2. This is absolutely disgusting on China’s part. Seriously Wth? Furthermore, there’s nothing stopping the crew from telling passengers that they’re Taiwanese.

  3. China can say what they want about lapel flags etc. and it isn’t going to make any difference. The people of Taiwan will decide their own destiny. Full stop.

  4. ‘Draw the line’, are you kidding? The only thing that matters in the Arabian Gulf is money. The airline could not give a toss about how Taiwan, nor their Taiwan employees feel. Especially when access to a market of +1billion people could be made ‘complicated’ .

  5. Gives new meaning to the word KOWTOW … typically thuggish and humiliating move by the wizened Market-Leninist propaganda masters in Beijing (who do stuff like this when not otherwise lining their silk-suit pockets with bribes)

  6. I’m Taiwanese and this is just typical propaganda from the Chinese government. A lot of my friends actually thought Taiwan is part of China due to propaganda like this one, so I always ask them if you flew to Taiwan today are you going to see Taiwanese flag flying, or the Chinese flag flying? Either they didn’t notice it or they haven’t been there.

    I think having a flag flying over your cities is the best way to represent, not just having your own currency or passport (HK has it, but HK is 100% part of China, again see what flag is flying over HK).

  7. I am with United Airlines; after I took the language test and became Mandarin qualified in 1995, I was given 2 flag pins: China and Taiwan. Along with a letter of instruction: wear Taiwan flag while flying to TPE; wear China flag flying to China; wear both while flying to HKG ( before the handover). This is just common sense.

  8. I get what China tries to achieve here, but I would have expected Emirates to play this with more dignity to their employees from Taiwan. Instructing them to remove the flag might be fine to honor your business partner China, but to ask them to REPLACE it with the China flag is too much of an ask. They should just make this a smart change by saying “Wearing flags is optional and on exiting Emirate aircrafts in China requires to remove the Taiwanese flag”. That way employees can decide to remove or replace the taiwanese flag.

  9. This is China’s way of bullying; with money. Look at what they’ve done to South Korea. Ever since SK agreed to go along with THAAD, China placed a ban on tour groups to SK. As a result, SK’s economy is in the tank. They’ve done the same to Taiwan.

  10. Is this confirmed now? As it has been referred to as unconfirmed by several sources.

    If it is true, that’s just a pathetic government move in my opinion, yet it would not be fully unexpected.

    China is still often not allowing companies to do business in China if they do business in Taiwan. Especially for airlines this can have quite an impact as they have a representative position in some cases. Aeropolitics is not limited to the skies.

    This is also the reason why things like “KLM Asia” exist. Subsidiaries created only in order to allow flying to Taiwan while maintaining traffic rights in PRC.

  11. Time for Trump to officially recognize the Republic of China as an independent country. Push back against Red China’s war of tiny erasures.

  12. This is just showing the world how bully works and sadly most of the countries in this world give in to China.
    Tell me how you take on this when one day, British tells any country not to recognize U.S.A. As a country and that cannot put U.S. flag any where, but in stead they ask you to only accept British flag.

  13. @katie you must not been to hong kong recently, flags in hk usually 5 stars red flag accompany with lotus or hk regional flag.

    @Ben, theres latest update after aggressive feedback from the Taiwanese associates, that emirates is rescinding the decision, however no flags can be pinned nor required on the uniform.

  14. This move is ridiculous and petty. Throwing your weight around like a spoiled child is unbecoming. If you want to be treated with respect, you have to show some as well. PRC is instead acting like a bully.

  15. Oh…by the way…the mainland China flag has never landed in Taiwan anywhere anyway. What makes anyone to think that Taiwan belongs to China?

  16. @Owen Trump will cave (to the point of withdrawing military support) if prc offers to cancel $1T of us debt faster than you can say maga

  17. Below is what latest update from emirates earlier in appropriate requests.

    Dear All,

    After reviewing your responses to the email below the original request for you to wear a Chinese flag was incorrect and inappropriate.
    Please refrain from wearing your Taiwanese flags on flights until further notice. Therefore no flag is required on your uniform.
    I do apologize for any upset that I may have caused.

    Regards,
    Nicola

  18. I get why the Taiwanese flags are not acceptable to the communists but the crew should be under no compulsion to wear the flag of the PRC. The email implies otherwise and that’s distasteful.

  19. I am very surprised… I feel like crews on China Airline and EVA Airways probably will wear this pin, and are NOT required to wear the PRC flag pin… And I have also seen United crews wear ROC flag pins without ever hearing about this. Very strange…

  20. No one in China actually care whether Taiwan belongs to China or not. TW is not like Iraq or Syria where you can dig out a bunch of petroleum. It’s just a war between U.S. and Chinese government and all the others are just their bullets.

  21. Yeah this is so typical. Blame China for everything. Nowhere it says Emirate made the decision under pressure from China?

    @Lucky Another disappointing post from you and again you lost your credibility. You jumped into something so quickly and cannot wait to publish the piece without confirming. What is the difference between you and those fake news produced by Trump/Russia &CO?

  22. People’s Army internet troll division 6B has landed on the beaches.

    Hello comrades!

  23. @DiscountEconomyFlyer – LOL.

    wielding double jade swords, no less! 😉

    Xoxo from Singapore

  24. No flag is better than a foreign flag you are forced to wear, disgusting behavior from China. I’m glad Emirates is not blindly following insane requests.

  25. It may seems unbelievable by americans. But in some asian countries, Taiwan is officially recognize as Chinese Taipei, which part of People’s Republic of China sovereignity.

    China heavily enforce their one chinese policy while Taiwanese didn’t have much political bargaining power. As long as they can do bussines, they go along with it.

    Mocking chinese policy in the comment just like chinese passenger making ruckus in a flight. Surely you guys understand.

  26. I wonder what would happen if a Taiwanese Emirates employee got a pin saying something along the lines of “Ask me”?

  27. @James “Chinese Taipei” is used as a designation for sporting events such as the Olympics,Asian Games, World Baseball Classics, or other non-political organizations or events. Sovereign nations, Asia or elsewhere, does not use “Chinese Taipei”. Almost all the nations in the world either recognize the People’s Republic of China (China) or the Republic of China (Taiwan), not Chinese Taipei

  28. This isn’t really surprising. Emirates is out of the UAE and that is hardly a tolerant country where if you speak out against the government you are dragged off and tortured. No real shock they would trample employee rights. The initial email forcing people from Taiwan to wear a chinese pin was beyond disgusting. Of course, I guess all the human rights abuses and intolerant attitudes don’t matter if you get to fly first class huh?

  29. @Ben not Lucky: you misunderstand. Chinese Taipei is not an official name. Its something to differentiate the island’s people from the mainland. Check your information source again. Only few countries acknowledge ROC officially and have their embassy in Taipei. Other is ‘just’ representative office. They are not even member of UN. Please don’t mix up political, business or sports. Its the reason I use “sovereignity”.

  30. This is a completely legitimate. Think about what if a some crew member wears a Confederate flag. What would the US government do?

  31. This all really goes back to the corrupt Nationalist party when they got kicked out by the Communist party back in the days. The Nationalist in Taiwan dreamed of going back and re-conquering China but of course that never happened. Taiwan could have become a sovereign nation in 1970s before US recognize Communist China. But of course the Nationalist couldn’t loose face because that would mean they would have to admit that they thoroughly lost the war. Hence now Taiwan is bullied by China every way possible because every country in the world kowtow to money. Unfortunately in 1970s, Taiwanese people had no say in this matter as anyone dare to say anything against the Nationalist government from China will disappear in the middle of the night….

  32. I don’t know why you think this is controversial.

    Every time this PRC vs. ROC topic comes up everyone starts arguing whether it is right or wrong but why does it even matter in this particular case? Access are governed by bilateral treaties, no? If Emirates wants access to PRC market, it needs to comply with the requirement set by PRC. Don’t like it? Then don’t fly to China. I mean no one is forcing EK to fly to PVG or PEK, yes?

    At least China doesn’t require Emirates to create a separate subsidiary to fly to TPE. Anyone remembers KLM Asia or BAA (British Asia Airways)? Now that is cumbersome!

  33. This is as ridiculous as the UK mandating that Emirates Crews all wear UK flags since FAs should all have some level of English proficiency.

    Just curious, what if the flight attendant speaks Taiwanese in addition to Mandarin as is very common on Eva airlines? Many in the older generation in Taiwan only speak Taiwanese and many in subsequent generations still speak it at home. Does China force Emirates crews to also wear PRC flags if they are Cantonese-speaking? It seems to me the HK Orchid would help distinguish the languages better. Maybe China should mandate that Hong Kong Airlines change their logo to Communist stars with hammer/sickle. While at it, why not claim that Richmond BC, Monterey Park CA, etc. are all integral parts of China.

    @YiChing – Unfortunately I saw a couple smaller businesses flying small PRC flags in Taiwan a few years ago. It upset me to the point of when I heard some Mainland tourists at “Queen’s Head” saying “there are some foreigners” in Chinese upon seeing my 1/2 Taiwanese kids and my white self, I muttered back “foreigners?! You are foreigners” back in Chinese. Fortunately it didn’t cause an international incident. Fortunately also I didn’t see the flags during the last couple trips though am still not happy when I see them in HK or Macau.

  34. @James No i did not misunderstand you. I just said it is “Chinese Taipei” not used in diplomacy, but mostly in international sporting events. You are the one that said “But in some Asian countries, Taiwan is OFFICIALLY recognize as Chinese Taipei, which part of People’s Republic of China sovereignty.”. The few countries that have diplomatic relationship recognize Taiwan as Republic of China. The rest of the world that have diplomatic relationship with PROC/ Mainland China recognize Taiwan as “Taiwan, Province of China”.

    I don’t need to check my sources. One of my three passports is issued by the Taiwan, Republic of China.

  35. It’ll be interesting to see if said flight attendants will be given a different pin to wear. Something with or in the shape of the island of Taiwan perhaps.

  36. Selfishly as a China-mainland FFQ lover, I support ‘One China’ policy. But in terms of this requirement, I have to confess that people from Taiwan should preserve their uniqueness.

  37. @Ben not Lucky: so you are a taiwanese eh? No wonder your understanding is like that. Oh well, whatever your political interest, fact is, Taiwan is not recognize as sovereign country by most of the world. Lol

  38. @James resorting to ad hominem does not really help your arguments. Nor does it help China’s image to the rest of the world…

  39. @James ” Taiwan is not recognize as sovereign country by most of the world. Lol”

    That is correct. I don’t know why you keep repeating the same thing that I just said

  40. China bullying again. Living in Hong Kong (where the flag is a bauhinia, not an orchid ), this is nothing new. It may seem small for those out of the region but here, just another example of hyper-sensitive China flexing its muscles again. Wonder if the Hong Kong flag is next.
    Emirates, you’ve lost my business.

  41. Interesting communication from Emirates. Hats off to them for the follow up email. Admitting they got it wrong and apologising takes courage and humility. Well done.

  42. “One China policy” is a very common policy when doing any business with Chinese government. If you do not understand the long history between mainland China and Taiwan, do not put your own judgement too easily on this issue. As a powerful government, the split of the country is a red line that could not be crossed.

  43. Well what if Emirates also has an ISIS flag? Remember even the confederate flags are “banned” now in the States…

  44. Is this bullying? Probably yes.

    Which country did China learn the bullying from?

    (I think all of you know the answer…)

  45. Actually, what was controversial is not the One China principle – BOTH China and Taiwan recognize that principle. What is wrong is Emirates insisting crew members to wear the flag of the People’s Republic of China, which is not the government of the Taiwanese flight attendants.

    Taiwan is the Republic of China, so technically, one could argue that the Taiwanese flag is also a Chinese flag… just not the flag of the People’s Republic of China. So practically, just don’t wear a pin when flying to the PRC since it upsets them, problem solved. Whoever wrote the original email should have handled it much better.

    Readers of this blog would of course know already that the flag carrier of Taiwan is…. drumroll please….. China Airlines!

    p.s. I am not a legal, constitutional or political expert by any means so take the above with a grain of salt, but I think I know enough to comment casually 😛

  46. 1. Is the “One China Policy” established by PRC solely?
    In 1991, both PRC and ROC officially agreed that there is only one China, but each party can have different definition of “China” (PRC v.s. ROC). Therefore, Taiwan is indeed officially part of Republic of China.

    2. Is China bullying Taiwan?
    Of course yes, just like how United States have been bullying American Indians, Iraq, Palestine, Mexico, Philippines, Syria, Egypt and Cuba for DECADES. You felt disgusting? Accept it. This is a world where only powerful countries determine the game rules.

    3. Do I think it is right to enforce this rule?
    I am afraid so, because it is a legitimate bargain power during a business negotiation. Both UAE and China are looking forward to bigger benefits together.

    4. Do I personally like this rule?
    I don’t think so. I am a Chinese but I wish Taiwanese have the right to choose not to wear a flag pin of which country they do not believe in.

  47. 5. Does Lucky have a political view of this event?
    I am afraid so. Lucky has obviously been annoyed by China during his trips, so it’s hard for him to clear away his unhappiness. I can fully understand and I believe it’s his freedom to do so.

  48. LOL I’m amused by seeing so many ignorant posts here. Taiwan is just a province of China, though it is not controlled by Chinese government now due to some historical reason happened 70 years ago. All most all countries in the world, including the US, recognize and accept that as a fact. However, I do agree it’s overdone to ban Taiwanese flags.

  49. Another disgusting communist disregard for sovereignty of democratic governments. And yes, the Zhong Gong (中共, Chinese communists) people trolling when their beloved leader, Mao and its successors are criticised to its slightest.
    It’s amazing to find out that the defeat of democracy in China in 1949 turns out to be one of the biggest disasters in 20th century (after the Soviet revolution and German Election campaign of 1933)
    I can only feel for the Taiwanese people forced to wear flags of their enemies whose only reason of existence is to eradicate anyone who do not follow communism and Maoism.

  50. Emirates has a lot of flights overflying China and Chinese government deliberately delays (by deliberate mix up of ATC wothout warning) flights of airlines that do not kowtow to Chinese government – so I can also only feel for Emirates who had many East Asian and Southeast Asian flights at stake.

  51. For Emirates this is not even a political issue… (but it *can* be for the Chinese government.) It’s just about doing business with (or in) mainland China. If Emirates doesn’t follow the rules then they simply can’t fly to PEK or PVG. Then it will lose money. That’s it.

  52. @ Mcfocus I think you have over-simplified the situation, which is exactly what Emirate did to land itself in hot water in the first place

    1. Is the “One China Policy” established by PRC solely?

    You are very confused. There is no such thing as “One China Policy” established by PRC/ROC.

    PRC’s One-China “Principle” is established solely by the PRC. The “US” One-China “Policy” is established solely by the State Department of the US. While they sound similar and can be confusing, the two are very different in regards to how Taiwan is treated.

    Principle – There is only one China in the world. PRC is the sole and legitimate representative of China. Taiwan is an inalienable part of China.
    US One China Policy – the US recognises the PRC as the sole government of Mainland China. Taiwan is not part of Mainland China. The US has its obligations toward the people of Taiwan and interacts with the Authority of Taiwan in accordance with the Taiwan Relationship Act.

    In 1991, PRC and ROC “negotiated” on the topic of One China (no “policy” or “principle”), but never reached an agreement/consensus. Had an agreement/consensus been reached there would have been some sort of document signed by representatives of each government. Sorry, but none existed.

    Taiwan is currently administered by the exiled Republic of China Government. Taiwan has never been resolved into the ROC in accordance with Article 4 of the ROC Constitution.

    The PRC can fantasise how they want, the fact is it never, since its birth in 1949, ruled a single inch of the island known as Taiwan.

    2. Is China bullying Taiwan?
    Of course yes. In the Chinese’s view, it is okay to bully others, because “This is a world where only powerful countries determine the game rules”.

    The US never wink-winked Emirates that FA’s from Iraq, Palestine, Mexico, Philippines, Syria, Egypt and Cuba are to wear a US flag on their uniform, or stopped those countries to participate in international organisations such as the UN, ICAO and WHO.

    The US only told Emirate no laptops in the cabin.

    3. Do I think it is right to enforce this rule?
    No, and Emirates have already backtracked their first email to require TW FA’s to wear PRC flags.

    5. Does Lucky have a political view of this event?
    Yes he does, we live in a free world, and in a free world everyone can have a political view on any event! And this is Lucky’s blog.

  53. Be it bully or not, those from free and democratic regions cursing PRC government should check with your own government first why your country don’t maintain a normal diplomatic relationship with the country called Taiwan, unless you are from those 20 some countries that indeed recognize ROC-not even Taiwan.

  54. While China’s pettiness is ridiculous here, it is equally ridiculous to claim that China is “forcing Emirates” to do anything. China doesn’t own Emirates in any way and they are free to have their crews to wear pins that may be considered offensive in any nation or culture. If they do want to fly to China they will have to play by the rules however, no matter how ridiculous they are.

    If any party should be called out here it is Emirates.

  55. @Alex
    “Taiwan is part of China”

    How very old school, imperial of you.

    I thought in the modern world we believed in people’s right to self-determination? So, if some reasonably coherent unit wants to form its own polity, why on earth would anyone oppose that?

    It’s why Argentina’s claim to the Falklands/ Malvinas is based on a false premise: they see it is about geographical coherence, ignoring the wishes of the actual people who live on the islands.

    I can understand that some cultures find this idea difficult – the US fought a particularly bloody civil war on the basis that once you are a part of the union you are never, ever allowed to secede.

    Conversely, the U.K. ended centuries of imperial misery by agreeing to the secession of (most of) Ireland. The solution was incomplete and had lingering unpleasant consequences, but the principle of self-determination is clear.

    If the people of Taiwan don’t want to be subsumed under the government of PRC, why should they be? If the people of Scotland don’t want to be part of the U.K., ditto.

    It’s all about recognising the rights of humans, rather than giving precedence to the overweening power of the imperial state.

  56. Finally the Chinese government grew some balls and decided to do something about these Taiwanese. For years, the Taiwanese have been discriminating against Chinese mainlanders, calling us every insulting and degrading names imaginable, and Chinese government did nothing about it. You lost the war, get over it. No one cares about you anymore. The land is ours and will always be so, but if you don’t want to be part of the family, leave.

  57. @doublejade

    Well, as you can see here, anyone defending China is automatically considered to be paid by the Chinese government. Given this kind of environment, anything about China is great material to attract attention.

  58. @Jae Yu
    Israel has a legitimate claim to Palestine, China’s is much more murky.

  59. @Paul
    The better example would be, if Hawaiians want to be independent, why doesn’t the US government allow it? Until Hawaii is free from the US, everyone from American needs to STFU about the Taiwan’s independence, or you might choke on your hypocrisy.

  60. @Paul Why do you still have double standard?

    The European colonists have killed million of American Indians before they even got a chance for the “civil war”. Did they ever had any chance for independency?

  61. @every amerian who’s about to say something about human rights, note that your right of speaking on this matter has been revoked, on the ground that your government insist on legalising child rapes and child marriages, and refusing to do anything about it, just to get a few votes in. (referring to the Sherry Johnson story) China has its (many) flaws, but at least we do something about child abusers (people don’t call america the land of phedofilia for no reason).

  62. A lot of Mainland Chinese with anglicized IDs posting here today. Tip to those people: don’t forget to use determiners in your sentences

  63. Here’s a non-political observation.

    What if the flags indicate language skills rather than national origin? In Europe at least, it is normal to use a French flag to denote a French speaker, a German flag to denote a German speaker – and all this is independent of national origin. Another example – if you wanted an English audioguide at a tourist attraction, you would look for the one with a Union Jack sign on it. Most English speakers (from any part of the world) understood this, although I would occasionally hear Americans asking why there was no Stars and Stripes audioguide.

    If someone had a Belgian flag pin, what language would you conclude they speak? It could be Flemish, French or German.

    I wonder what flag they use to denote an Arabic speaker? Someone from Morocco might not necessarily recognise the flag of the UAE, but chances are, both of them would understand each other’s Arabic.

  64. This isn’t just about Emirates as an airline, China could use it’s business and economic clout to punish Dubai or even the UAE as a whole. China plays dirty, y’all.

    @J Dee

    Let them keep forgetting, it makes their comments all the more hilarious 🙂

  65. @ Mcfocus I think you have over-simplified the situation, which is exactly what Emirate did to land itself in hot water in the first place

    1. Is the “One China Policy” established by PRC solely?

    You are very confused. There is no such thing as “One China Policy” established by either PRC or ROC.

    PRC’s One-China “Principle” is established solely by the PRC. The “US” One-China “Policy” is established solely by the State Department of the US. While they sound similar, they are very different things.

    PRC’s One-China Principle – There is only one China in the world. PRC is the sole and legitimate representative of China. Taiwan is an inalienable part of China.
    US One China Policy – the US recognises the PRC as the sole government of Mainland China and acknowledge PRC’s claim over Taiwan. The US interacts directly with the people of Taiwan and the Authority “on” Taiwan in accordance with the Taiwan Relations Act.

    In October 1992, PRC and ROC “met” and “discussed” the topic of One China (no “policy” or “principle”), but never reached an agreement/consensus. Had an agreement/consensus been reached there would have been some sort of document signed by representatives of each government and PRC would show it to the world in a flash. None existed.

    Taiwan is currently administered by the exiled Republic of China Government. Exiled because Taiwan has never been resolved into the ROC in accordance with Article 4 of the ROC Constitution.

    Despite PRC’s continued hallucination of Taiwan being part of China, the fact is since PRC came into existence in 1949, it never ruled a single inch of Taiwan. As long as PRC continues to present itself as the only legitimate government of China and there is only one China, then Taiwan has never been part of China.

    2. Is China bullying Taiwan?
    Of course yes. In the Chinese’s view, it is okay to bully others, because “This is a world where only powerful countries determine the game rules”.

    The US never wink-winked Emirates that FA’s from Iraq, Palestine, Mexico, Philippines, Syria, Egypt and Cuba are to wear a US flag on their uniform. The US also never stopped those countries to participate in international organisations such as the UN, ICAO and WHO.

    The US only told Emirate “no laptops/tablets in the cabin when you fly here from Dubai”.

    3. Do I think it is right to enforce this rule?
    Well, a Chinese may think it is right, but Emirates have already backtracked their first email and its TW FA’s are no longer required to wear the PRC flag.

    5. Does Lucky have a political view of this event?
    Maybe. But then we live in a free world, and unlike in PRC, in a free world everyone can have a political view on any event, and some definitely wouldn’t be impressed by this particular news to say the least.

  66. A lot of native American speakers with anglicized IDs posting here today. Tip to those people: don’t forget to use periods at the end of your sentences, especially @J Dee and @Julia.

  67. I used a smiley face, which was substituted for the period. But just in case, here is another smiley face after the period in this sentence. 🙂

  68. @ N1JLPT

    You are over-simplified the situation and disguised the concept.

    I never said that the US would have done wink-winked Emirates for doing so (by the way, do you have any proof of China do so? No proof no verdict), nor did I said that the US would have stopped any other country to participate in international organisations – but is that all what you can do to bully a country? Is that all? Is that simple?

    The US has fired tons of wars in Middle East, Eastern Europe and Americas and left millions of citizens homeless (many dead). Is “bullying by war” a better way than bullying by “wink-wink to wear flag pin”?

    “This is a world where only powerful countries determine the game rules.” It is the game defined by those countries with double standards.

    Taiwan has never bullied the innocent? How about the native Taiwanese been massacred after 1949?

  69. @N1JLPT

    In terms of the “One China Principle”, I would like to refer to these materials:

    1. Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1992_Consensus
    2. American Foreign Policy Interests: https://www.ncafp.org/articles/01%20The%201992%20Consensus-%20A%20Review%20and%20Assessment.pdf
    3. ROC official news: http://www.mac.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=113323&ctNode=6337&mp=3

    “Unlike in PRC, in a free world everyone can have a political view on any event.”
    – I am afraid there are various exceptions (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_free_speech_exceptions). I am a Canadian citizen currently living in China and definitely not a representative of Chinese government, but I suggest you not be over-generalized. If you want to criticize China’s freedom of speech, feel free to do so. However if you live in China, you won’t actually find a big problem with free speech…Just disregard the propaganda about China – many of them are really biased.

    @Kaito has a point. Human right is a big issue in the world. Yet unfortunately, people are too unfamiliar with countries which they haven’t lived for long.

    @Julia: thanks for the grammar lesson 🙂

  70. “I am a Canadian citizen currently living in China and definitely not a representative of Chinese government”

    Suuuuuuuuurrre you are. Sure.

  71. @Mcfocus

    Thanks for providing links to illustrate how critical the 92 Consensus is.

    So where is the link to the actual piece of this very important document jointly signed in 1992 by representatives of the TWO China’s to agree there is only One China? PDF would be nice.

  72. @Mcfocus
    ““Unlike in PRC, in a free world everyone can have a political view on any event.”
    – I am afraid there are various exceptions ”

    In free world, free speech is the principle – with exceptions.
    In Communist China (中共), censorship is the principle, with exceptions where free speech is allowed.

    In the US, you have the freedom to criticise U.S. government.
    In Communist China, you don’t have any freedom to criticise Chinese government, but the communist party “generously” allows “exception” to criticise “Western imperialists” who practices democracy, free speech, human rights, etc.

  73. @ Aaron: What’s wrong with being a first-generation immigrant? 😉
    @ N1JLPT: Whether or not it exists does not change the fact that China is bullying Taiwanese FAs by winking Emirates to replace their flag pins… As I said, I don’t like the way China is doing, but I just meant it’s the game defined by all those mighty countries. There is no need to be double standards.
    @ Jay: As one of millions of non-Chinese residents in China (especially Shanghai), I felt that I never got any problem living here: I can still criticise the local government as well as see how they improve. Of course my full-time job is not a publicist. In addition, Western countries also “generously” allows “exception” to criticise “Communist China” as means of political propaganda.

  74. This article is not clear how “China Forces Emirates Crews”. I don’t get it. I think there’s something missing in the grammar of this article.

    How would they do this?? legally? Is Emirates a Chinese airline?
    Or does it just mean “on flights to/from PRC?”

    Who made this decision? Emirates? The UAE government? If so, well then it’s them doing it not China. Taiwanese Emirates employees are not Chinese citizens.

    This makes no more sense than “Finland forces Aeromexico cabin crew….”

  75. Q: The difference between Taiwan and China?
    A: That’s like the difference between Hawaii and USA

    Q: The difference between a a Taiwanese and a Chinese?
    A: That’s the difference between an Alaskan and an American

    Q: Is China bullying Taiwan? Is that even possible?
    A: Is USA bullying South Carolina? Is that even possible?

    Q: Everytime I fly from Taiwan to China
    A: Today, I just flew from Hawaii to USA

    Q: I like Taiwan. I hate China
    A: Me too. I adore Alaska. I hate USA

    Q: China is China. Nothing to do with Taiwan
    A: Yeah. And Kentucky is Kentucky. Nothing to do with USA

    Q: I am an American. I support Taiwan’s independence from China. In what concrete way can I show my support?
    A: By demonstrating that you truly support separatism and independence universally! Two simple way: (1) Search this website for a cheap flight to South Carolina. Climb South Carolina Capitol building and hoist up a confederate flag. When arrested, unfurl your pre-prepared banner which reads: “the future of Carolina is only for Carolinians to decide. Not Americans”. OR (2) Search this webnsite on how to fly to Washington DC on points, and how to Uber to Lincoln memorial. Once there, pee on Lincoln’s statue. Upon arrest, shout at the top of your voice: “Bloody Lincoln. You are the worst president ever. We should never ever be ‘One Nation Indivisible’ “. In performing either action, you demonstrate fully that you are a moral, ethical person whose noble view on independence is universal: what’s good for USA is good for China too – i.e. you are not a hypocritical bastard who wants a strong “one nation indivisible” for yourself, while labeling others as bullies and invaders after deliberately distorting history. This gives you the moral right to lecture the Chinese on what to do with Taiwan. Till then….*yawn* <– you really have no moral right to teach your grandmother to suck eggs. LOL

  76. Dear keyboard warriors and political wannabes,
    Talk is cheap. It’s like “mental masturbation” – self-satisfaction without real action. Action speaks louder than words. So do it! For example:

    1. If you are a South Carolinian wanting independence from the United States, do this – put up the confederation flag on your state capitol building; Burn the flag of USA; Start a military onslaught against US air force and US marine etc; Then we shall all see whether the 300 million Americans (minus whatever the polulation in S. Carolina} will say: “We Americans will not bully you South Carolinian. It is undemocratic for us to impose our popular will on you. The future of South Carolina is up to South Carolinian – and only South Carolinians, not the rest of USA – to decide.You have the human rights to be independent, free, and proud. And I will help you by peeing on Abraham Lincoln’s statue in Washington DC, for Lincoln is the worst president ever for insisting on ‘one nation indivisible’ “. Do that, and I will respect you. Talk is cheap.

    2. If you are from Scotland, or Quebec etc wanting independence, do this – in voting for independence, add the following proposal into the voting agenda: “upon indepedence, for the sake of national security, Scotland / Quebec will invite Russia to put sufficient tactical nuclear missiles (and whatever other necessary offensive weapons) along the border of scotland-england / quebec-restOfCanada, such that Scotland / Quebec will be the new frontline military base of Russia against the rest of UK / Canada.” Then we shall all see whether the Briton and Canadian will say: “Unlike Russia which protested against NATO setting up new military bases in newly independent ex-USSR states near Russian border, and stupid Americans who started a cuban missile crisis just because Russia wanted to put nuclear weapons in Cuba, do not worry – we Britons / Canadians very proudly respect and welcome Scotland / Quebec becoming ‘independent’ in name, but actually russian stooges in reality; We are democratic people who do not bully others. We respect your human rights to be independent – if the result of Scotland / Quebec’s independence is that you will hosts many Russian military bases with tactical nuclear missiles able to reach London / Toronto and our major cities within minutes (which Russia will do tic-for-tat against abovementioned NATO action), we are happy to live with it because we know you are just trying to defend yourself against us and since we won’t attack you, there is nothing for us to be afraid…”. Do that, and I will respect you. Talk is cheap.

    3. As for the taiwanese people. Sigh. How about we start with the simplest action – get your parliament to outlaw your Republic of China‘s flag, and rename it in law as Taiwan’s Flag. Surely such an action is stronger than your cheap talk of “taiwan flag, taiwan flag, taiwan flag” which does NOT exist in your law! Then let’s see whether the 1 billion Chinese people are as gutless and weak as the Americans in example 1 above, or as ball-less as the Britons and Canadians in example 2 above.

    4. As for the rest of you “Taiwan flag” (is there even such a thing?) supporter – if you are an American, can you please show some concrete support (rather than just moral cheap talk)? An airfare to Washington DC is inexpensive, as readers on this site knows. A Uber trip to the Lincoln Memorial is convenient too, as Lucky will tell you. Go pee on Lincoln’s statue and say loud enough for all the visitors to hear: “To hell with ‘one nation indivisible’. South Carolina’s independence or otherwise, is up to the people of South Caolinians only to decide. And if that results in South Carolina hosting Russia nuclear tactical missiles within minutes of Washington DC, like the cuban missile crisis all over again, so be it”. — do that. I am sure 300 million Americans will applaud your democracy, non-bullying position, and oh yes, respect for human rights to be independent.

    Talk is cheap. Dont be a keyboard warrior like me. Don’t masturbate mentally. Do it. Need Lucky Ben to teach you how to buy cheap fare to Washington DC and how to get good Uber rates?

  77. @cheapThrill I don’t agree with what you just said but I surely I look down on those Taiwanese supporters. They’re indeed keyboard warriors!

  78. @cheapthrill and @kaito: To equate the situation with Taiwan and the PRC with anything related to the history of the United States is utterly ridiculous. As has been pointed out, Taiwan has never been under the governmental control of the PRC. NEVER. That is way different than anything else involving any of the internal historical strife involving the United States. Get that into your thick skulls. And if you poll the Taiwanese citizens, I am sure a large section of them would love to have the removal of the word China from anything relating to their government, but in case you haven’t heard, the PRC has threatened to invade Taiwan if the Taiwanese make any move of declaring actual independence. Why else would the Beijing always get so pissy when a DPP candidate wins? So before you cast any stones about how the Taiwanese should go and revoke any mention of China, maybe you should go tell your government to let the Taiwanese people decide without any threats of retaliation. And your analogies make no sense.

  79. Go China! Don’t be ashamed to be a bully. People succumb to power, those who protest just want to get a chance to succumb to power. And forget all those western ideologies: freedom, equality, blah, blah, they are just there to confuse their dumb citizens.

    –Some Chinese dude living in the US, for their cheap luxury cars and big houses.

  80. It seems that cross-strait relations have become increasingly tense after the pro-independence Tsai Ying-wen became President of Taiwan.
    If you want to understand more about why Taiwan is called Chinese Taipei in sporting events as well as in most international organizations, such as WTO, you can see the video below from a Taiwanese programme with English subtitle in it.
    The link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKElFdaGHbk

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