Beautiful Malaysia Airlines #KeepFlying Tribute Song

Malaysia Airlines (and the airline industry as a whole) had a horrible year last year, having lost both MH370 and MH17 (I know all things considered it was still one of the safest years ever for the industry, but when two of the most modern jet liners go down in such a short period, it’s shocking).

As a tribute, Malaysia Airlines has created a beautiful song (and corresponding music video), entitled “SKY #keepflying,” performed by Lilly (I’m not sure who that is, but that doesn’t really matter).

Here’s how they describe the video:

Keep flying high with SKY, a debut single of Malaysia’s singer-songwriter, Lilly. A tribute to the people who will always be part of us and those who #keepflying high in the face of hardship.

Here’s the video:

Well done, Malaysia Airlines!

(Tip of the hat to The Winglet)

Comments

  1. “Malaysia Airlines (and the airline industry as a whole) had a horrible year last year, having lost both MH370 and MH17 (I know all things considered it was still one of the safest years ever for the industry, but when two of the most modern jet liners go down in such a short period, it’s shocking).”

    The loss of MH370 was among the most shocking events in aviation history. However, the loss of MH17 was merely bad judgement flying over an active war zone. You’d think MH would be extremely careful after the loss of MH370 but you’d be wrong. At this point all the sappy emotionally manipulative videos in the world aren’t going to get me back on an MH flight anytime soon.

  2. It pains me that people are still so ignorant of the actual safety of flying and the pretty good record Malaysia Airlines has despite MH370 and MH17, that they make sweeping statements about not wanting to fly them for no other reason than that ignorance. Nicely done by Malaysia. #keepflying

  3. “It pains me that people are still so ignorant of the actual safety of flying and the pretty good record Malaysia Airlines has despite MH370 and MH17, that they make sweeping statements about not wanting to fly them for no other reason than that ignorance.”

    I don’t avoid MH because I think I’m going to die. Statistically that’s highly unlikely. However, the loss of MH370 and MH17 gave me a reason to look deeper into MH than I had before. Their finances, their public relations, their regulatory environment, their corporate culture, and their inability to manage adversity left a lot to be desired.

    The issues discovered as people searched for clues to the fate of MH370 (lack of proper passenger scanning, random people being allowed on active flight decks, hiring and promotion influenced by relations and status over training and performance, and shocking indifference in the face of adversity) left a sour taste in my mouth. These issues go far beyond some silly song and dance about keeping spirits up.

    Thanks to MH’s poor management they had already been forced to scale back much of their network long before MH370 ever left the ground. These days I would have to travel thousands of miles just to reach the nearest airport from which MH flies and I cannot imagine going out of my way and paying out of my own pocket to fly an airline that survives only in spite of itself.

    MH could have built an airline similar to SQ but instead they coasted along as a second tier follower and eventually began running out of money and relevance in the global airline market. These days MH would be wise to either liquidate their holdings or transition into an aircraft leasing company for airlines that still know what they’re doing.

    That’s my opinion anyway.

  4. Dax, you are entitled to your opinions, but may I point out that Singapore Airlines & Lufthansa had more flights overflying that “warzone” in the days & months preceeding the MH17 shootdown. Indeed, an SQ flight from Copenhagen was just minutes away from MH17 – had the rebels waited a bit later we would have been discussing about SQ351 instead of MH17.

    So I really don’t feel it’s bad judgement for MH to be using a route which Eurocontrol & many other established airlines deem to be safe.

  5. Honestly, from a PR/marketing perspective I think they need to drop the subject rather than keep reminding everyone of their unfortunate year with a song/campaign every other month. It’s rather depressing and keeps the subject of “accidents and crashes” on prospective flyers’ minds. Of course nobody who has been affected by these disasters will every forget, but Malaysia Airlines — the company — really needs to move on. Soon enough, it’s all they will ever be known for.

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