Passenger Removed From A Flight Over Allergies?!

Check out this NBC 10 Philadelphia story about a girl who was removed from a US Airways flight between Charlotte and Philadelphia after she asked the flight attendant for Benadryl due to allergies.

Apparently they kept asking her the trigger questions for Ebola, if she has been outside the country, etc.

Here’s the story:

On the plus side, at least US Airways paid for her hotel and rebooked her the next day.

It is common practice for airlines not to let sick passengers fly, though denying someone boarding over allergies seems a bit extreme.

Do you think her being removed from the flight has to do with the Ebola paranoia going on in the US, or were they justified in doing so?

(Tip of the hat to Heels First)

Comments

  1. Paranoia.
    On the other hand, I wish there were times they would be more proactive- On a flight from LHR to LAX in May a teenager vomited all over the gangway, and could barely stand. Her mother explained to flight attendents that she was just car sick from the trip to the airport (had to arrive at least 2 hours prior but still sick?), and would be fine. The attendents allowed her on the plane. Although, thankfully, things seem to have gone smoothly (I was in business, she in coach, but I didn’t hear any major disturbances), they put everyone one the plane at risk of catching a virulent stomach bug, or at the least having to listen to her be sick for hours at a time.

  2. Better safe than sorry. If there is any doubt about a passenger’s fitness to fly, the airline has the responsibility to deny them boarding.

  3. Really the airlines bring these sickness problems on themselves when they charge flight change fees and make it hard to redeposit miles when one wants to cancel a flight due to sickness. So what happens? People fly sick because the airlines force them to!

  4. Mob/Mass-Hysteria well documented and from the information you gave us it certainly doesn’t merit being removed from the plane. Now on the other end (I’m married to a Flight Attendant) Airplanes are the filthiest form of transportation. After each flight the cleaning crew has 7 minutes to get the plane ready for the next mob, you try doing that.

    On another note: why is the media not all over this??

    http://dailycaller.com/2012/05/04/toxic-uniforms-sicken-1-in-10-alaska-airlines-flight-attendants/
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2139763/Hundreds-flight-attendants-toxic-new-uniforms-causing-hair-fall-making-ill.html

    These are the xoins found in the uniforms

    Heavy metals found

    Antimony DiIsodecyl Fumarate Formaldehyde
    Chromium hexavalent Dimethyl Fumarate TriButyl Phosphate
    2-ethyl hexl Fumarate Lead and Arsenic (not yet Quantified)

    Disperse Color dyes found

    Orange 37 and 76 (one of these is also known as Agent Orange)
    Blue 102 Red 17 Brown 1

    ‘Normal’ disperse dyes found cause no medical issues per tests performed
    Several of this list are not found in U.S. clothing use.
    Some of them have no test color to use when performing allergy testing, as they are either illegal in U.S. or rare to find for test use. Normal tests don’t cover these.

    All above chems and dyes were found in shirts, pants, skirts, jackets, pockets, and liner materials of Twin Hills uniforms.
    Heavy metals found

    Antimony DiIsodecyl Fumarate Formaldehyde
    Chromium hexavalent Dimethyl Fumarate TriButyl Phosphate
    2-ethyl hexl Fumarate Lead and Arsenic (not yet Quantified)

    Disperse Color dyes found

    Orange 37 and 76 (one of these is also known as Agent Orange)
    Blue 102 Red 17 Brown 1

    ‘Normal’ disperse dyes found cause no medical issues per tests performed
    Several of this list are not found in U.S. clothing use.
    Some of them have no test color to use when performing allergy testing, as they are either illegal in U.S. or rare to find for test use. Normal tests don’t cover these.

    All above chems and dyes were found in shirts, pants, skirts, jackets, pockets, and liner materials of Twin Hills uniforms.
    Heavy metals found

    Antimony DiIsodecyl Fumarate Formaldehyde
    Chromium hexavalent Dimethyl Fumarate TriButyl Phosphate
    2-ethyl hexl Fumarate Lead and Arsenic (not yet Quantified)

    Disperse Color dyes found

    Orange 37 and 76 (one of these is also known as Agent Orange)
    Blue 102 Red 17 Brown 1

    ‘Normal’ disperse dyes found cause no medical issues per tests performed
    Several of this list are not found in U.S. clothing use.
    Some of them have no test color to use when performing allergy testing, as they are either illegal in U.S. or rare to find for test use. Normal tests don’t cover these.

    All above chems and dyes were found in shirts, pants, skirts, jackets, pockets, and liner materials of Twin Hills uniforms.
    Heavy metals found

    Antimony DiIsodecyl Fumarate Formaldehyde
    Chromium hexavalent Dimethyl Fumarate TriButyl Phosphate
    2-ethyl hexl Fumarate Lead and Arsenic (not yet Quantified)

    Disperse Color dyes found

    Orange 37 and 76 (one of these is also known as Agent Orange)
    Blue 102 Red 17 Brown 1

    ‘Normal’ disperse dyes found cause no medical issues per tests performed
    Several of this list are not found in U.S. clothing use.
    Some of them have no test color to use when performing allergy testing, as they are either illegal in U.S. or rare to find for test use. Normal tests don’t cover these.

    All above chems and dyes were found in shirts, pants, skirts, jackets, pockets, and liner materials of Twin Hills uniforms.
    Heavy metals found

    Antimony DiIsodecyl Fumarate Formaldehyde
    Chromium hexavalent Dimethyl Fumarate TriButyl Phosphate
    2-ethyl hexl Fumarate Lead and Arsenic (not yet Quantified)

    Disperse Color dyes found

    Orange 37 and 76 (one of these is also known as Agent Orange)
    Blue 102 Red 17 Brown 1

    ‘Normal’ disperse dyes found cause no medical issues per tests performed
    Several of this list are not found in U.S. clothing use.
    Some of them have no test color to use when performing allergy testing, as they are either illegal in U.S. or rare to find for test use. Normal tests don’t cover these.

    All above chems and dyes were found in shirts, pants, skirts, jackets, pockets, and liner materials of Twin Hills uniforms.
    Heavy metals found: Antimony,DiIsodecyl Fumarate, Formaldehyde, Chromium hexavalent, Dimethyl Fumarate,TriButyl Phosphate, 2-ethyl hexl Fumarate & Lead and Arsenic, 2-ethyl hexl Fumarate, Lead and Arsenic.

    All these chemicals have reactions from a bloodstained arms and legs, unable breathe, women loosing their Hair, the list is as long as anyone could image. 1500 (the new hires don’t come forward for fear of reprisal, short termination for not passing their probation) have come forward and filed suit against Alaska to which Alaska said it’s mass-hysteria, but when presented with a piece of the uniform in a meeting all of the Management ran out of the conference room

    Alaska claims to have resolved the issue but only on Alaska Employees, the Contractor’s still wear the toxic uniforms restricting getting a decent schedule and pay cut.
    Maybe this isn’t the right forum for this but i wanted to share a coming up 5 year struggle

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