What Are Reserve Flight Attendants?

While it’s incredibly cheesy and a few years old, check out this video made by AirTran about the life of reserve flight attendants:

I can’t decide whether it’s more interesting or more cheesy… it’s a close call.

(Tip of the hat to The Forward Cabin)

Comments

  1. I believe delta flight attendants get their line immediately without going to reserve, thats why they are always so competitive.

    One said becoming a delta FA may be harder than getting into harvard.

  2. Hey Lucky, completely off topic. But I would like to ask you why you never fly Russian airlines, like SU or UN?

  3. @ Tom — Mainly because I’m too lazy to actually get a Russian visa, and I’d like to visit at some point. Just have a hard time separating myself from my passport for an extended period of time.

  4. @lucky You can get a second US passport, valid for 2 years if you travel frequently and may need to use one while the other is out for getting a visa. (Another reason is for travel to countries that don’t like to see other countries’ stamps, such as Israel/some Arab countries)

    I’m sure one of the passport agencies would comp you their fees for the process in exchange for publicity. Seems like one did so for TPG last September.

  5. @ Lucky — S7 on Avios is a great way to go for short-hauls (esp. since they have real business class). Hopefully you will make it there before that but visas won’t be necessary for World Cup 2018.

    Also, you know this since you’d transferred through Moscow but for the benefit of others I will say that you can transit without a visa if you stay airside for 24 hours or less. Looks like it’s only applicable to Moscow (DME, SVO, VKO), St. Petersburg (LED), and Yekaterinburg (SVX) at the moment — http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_Russia#Direct_airside_transit
    (Did that myself when flew IAH-DME/DME-VIE without any issues).

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