Is Emirates 777 Business Class Fully Flat?

There seems to be quite a bit of confusion out there over whether Emirates business class on the 777 is fully flat or not.

While Emirates has a fully flat staggered business class product on their A380, they have a different business class product on the 777.

Emirates-A380-Business-Class
Emirates A380 business class

Emirates-777-Business-Class-1
Emirates 777 business class cabin

The weird thing is that I’ve heard mixed reports as to whether or not Emirates’ 777 longhaul business class product is fully flat.

Even among people I know that have flown the Emirates 777, about half seem to think it is, while the other half seem to think it isn’t.

I finally had the chance to test out the longhaul Emirates 777-300ER business class seat for the first time today, and I can kind of see the confusion.

Emirates-777-Business-Class-3
Emirates 777 business class seat

Emirates’ 777 longhaul business class seat isn’t fully flat.

That being said, it’s hands down the most comfortable angled business class product I’ve ever tried, and the first angled seat I’ve flown that I could comfortably sleep in.

Emirates-777-Business-Class-4
Emirates 777 business class seat bed position

Emirates-777-Business-Class-5
Emirates 777 business class seat bed position

Emirates-777-Business-Class-6
Emirates 777 business class seat bed position

What makes this seat so much better than other angled seats is that the slight angle is in the area around your head, while the area for your feet is parallel to the ground. What usually annoys me most about non-fully flat seats is when the leg support is angled, since you feel like you’re sliding down the seat.

That’s not a problem in Emirates business class, fortunately.

Also, the Emirates business class seats have a ton of privacy. There’s a shield between seats, so you really do feel like you’re in your own cocoon when reclined.

Emirates-777-Business-Class-2
Emirates 777 business class cabin

The major downside, however, is that they have seven seats per row, so there’s a middle seat in the center section. It’s quite surprising that a leading airline like Emirates continues to take delivery of 777s with a business class product that has angled seats and middle seats, but I guess there’s a reason for that – they know they can get away with it, given how many other things they have going for them.

Regardless, it’s actually a fairly comfortable product, and much better than I was expecting for an angled product with seven seats per row. But it’s not quite fully flat.

If you’ve flown Emirates 777 business class, what was your experience?

Comments

  1. there are tons out there who confuses angled “lie-flat” with true flat bed, sometimes deliberately in order to make their favorite airline look less bad.

    angled/slanted business is one of the worst designs ever. I’ll take a very good recliner over that black diamond ski slope.

  2. Do you know how this compares to the KE A380 J seat, or the VA 777 J seat? Looks similar. Both of those call themselves horizontal flat bed, and I would agree with that, though the top part of the seat does not go down to be quite as perfectly straight as most herringbone seats, for example, do.

  3. In my experience, this setup is only good for those who sleep on their backs. If you’re a side or stomach sleeper, the slight elevation of the head bends your neck back uncomfortably.

  4. I love EK’s J seats. Outside of first class seats, I’ve always slept best on these slightly angled seats. I just flew Delta’s new staggered configuration, and it was awful. My freaking big feet get stck and I can’t lay flat!

  5. @ Bgriff — I do believe the Virgin Australia seat is “truly” flat, though not 100% sure about the Korean seat.

  6. as for the 7 seat configuration, 2-3-2, on the business, how does the middle of 3 gets out; say, going to restroom or for a walk ?

  7. That is unreal! ….it would be very bothersome to others, especially when they’re watching TV or asleep. Wondering what was Emirates thinking when they setup like that …

  8. I read several reports, though, that the new Chicago flight actually HAS true lie-flat seats. I haven’t taken it yet, but am scheduled for December….

  9. @ Em Jay — It’s the same exact product I just flew, so I think maybe we just have different interpretations of what constitutes “flat.”

  10. good catch Lucky– so it seems that they’re not either fully horizontal lie flat, nor angled lie flat, but some form of slightly angled horizontal.

    I’ve also flown a couple of times on the Emirates A330 business class (which also is 2 x 3 x 2 !!!!) and despite those being no where near lie flat, found them more comfortable than they look.

  11. @ Em Jay. The aircraft flying the Chicago routes rotate through the system, so I don’t think that Chicago would get a separate type of seat.

    Lucky where did you fly to/from? And what’s the reg no? It seems from the TV screens that this is one of the newer 777s.

  12. airlines that offer F and C must provide a substanial product difference to warrant the price difference (EK/LH/LX If it is the perceived the same like in SQ non-a380 F/C then the business class product eats up first class bookings. airlines without F, make their C their best offering (BR/OS)

  13. I’ve flown on the EK 77W and A380 in J before and both have its own pros and cons. The pros for the EK 77W is the foot space is a lot wider. It looks like you had the first row for business class and from the photos you had limitless feet space!

    On the A380, due to the staggered nature of the seating, foot space is a bit more limited.

    As far as fully flat and what not, all the times I was in J was due to an upgrade so I was just happy to be in the J cabin! Flat, or angled, I could care less!!! Both cases are better than flying economy! 😉

  14. I flew on EK J 777-300ER last week from Dubai to Jakarta. It wasn’t as comfortable as J seat in their A380 though I managed to catch a few hours of sleep. My main complaint was that I literally had to climb over my seatmate to go to toilet.

  15. Ben

    “@ Jonathan — You do have to “hop over” the person in the middle.”

    Aisle rather than middle?

  16. Lucky, the EK J seat you experienced is 170 degrees when in bed mode. I have spent many hours on this seat (100+ sectors) and the trick is requesting 6A or 6K. That’s in the smaller forward cabin. Also I sleep on my side and found that if you use 2 of the mattress pads, you’ll sleep no worries. They only give you a single pad to use but the spares are in the overheads.

  17. “Lucky, the EK J seat you experienced is 170 degrees when in bed mode. I have spent many hours on this seat (100+ sectors) and the trick is requesting 6A or 6K.”

    I too prefer the mini-cabin just behind the first class. But am curious – what’s special about 6A/K? Are they different?

  18. @ Adi-T — I was in 6K and found it to be extremely private. Since it’s the bulkhead there’s endless legroom, so you really feel like you’re in a cocoon of sorts.

  19. Last year I had the chance to fly MEL SIN on EK business and I really think it’s comfortable, even though I don’t normally sleep on day flights, I was able to nap for about 2 hours and while again, it’s shocking EK continues to use this product, I think it’s still decent.

    Also, it seems like the product’s been updated on the 777-300ER compared to the 300 I flew, the IFE controller’s newer and the seat tablet thingy also seems newer in the pictures above.

  20. I flew on the -300ER back in July SIN-MEL return. I thought the recline was pretty decent even though I don’t recline fully when I sleep. My only issue was the fact that the seat width wasn’t as good as what I’ve experienced on other airlines given the 2-3-2 config.

  21. it is important to note that the A380 business class is completely flat. I live in Melbourne and when I fly to KL about 4 times a year for work, my preference is to go on EK405 which means I have to go through singapore but the plane is A380 rather than the EK408 which is a 777 plane without a flat bed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *