TV show about a Condor 757 flight

There are many reasons to learn German. One is so that you can sound like you’re saying something mean when you’re really paying someone a compliment. Another is so you can use words like Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz.

But I think the single greatest thing about understanding German is being able to watch all the awesome airplane related documentaries they seem to have over there, like this one that I randomly stumbled across on YouTube last night, about a Condor 757-300 flying from Germany to Greece:

Or this one, about someone training to become a pilot in Germany:

There are tons of other great ones out there, but these are two I just came across yesterday.

Comments

  1. The Masked Poster says

    Condor video was interesting, even though my German skill are limited to ja and nein. I noted the pilots didn’t wear a hat, FAs still were stewardesses, and there was an abundance of overhead space. And no jetways, still stairs into the plane. Wish they would have shown more on loading cargo into the hold.

  2. Jorge says

    +1000 Michael

    Flying first class will be coach once you sit at the controls !
    Go for it while you can!

  3. Ivan Y says

    That’s pretty cool.

    In case anyone’s wondering this is what Rind… word was:

    Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz
    (das, 63 letters) “beef labeling regulation & delegation of supervision law”
    This was a 1999 German Word of the Year, and it also won a special award as the longest German word for that year. It refers to a “law for regulating the labeling of beef” – all in one word, which is why it is so long. German also likes abbreviations, and this word has one: ReÜAÜG.

    I said “was” since I guess it proved to be too much and Germans apparently dropped that law: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/10095976/Germany-drops-its-longest-word-Rindfleischeti….html

    Anyway, compounding nouns to make up longer words is kind of cheating :) That’s how you end up with things like the official longest word, a chemical name for protein Titin. It’s 189,819 letters long and there’s even a humorous video of a CEO of Esquire Russia pronouncing in — http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/10/worlds-longest-word_n_2272613.html

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