No more miles for purchases made with Chase Continental debit card startng July 12, 2011

Well, it seems the Chase Continental OnePass debit card will no longer earn miles starting in a few months:

Congress recently enacted a new law known as the Durbin Amendment that significantly impacts debit cards. As a result of this law, Chase will be changing the Chase Continental Airlines Debit Card program.

After July 12, 2011, cardholders will no longer earn Continental OnePass® miles when using the Chase Continental Airlines Debit Card. All OnePass miles you earn with your debit card until July 12, 2011 will be automatically deposited directly into your Continental OnePass account.

From earning 50,000 miles per year for Chase Continental sign-up bonuses to not even earning miles for purchases… how far we’ve come!

Surprisingly enough, I’ve actually maintained my Chase checking account as my primary account since my last checking account “churn,” though I guess I’ll be looking for a new place to bank now.

Comments

  1. What about refunding the annual fee? Remeber, you pay that fee at the beginning of the year, so if you got a debit card in December and paid the fee you should be entitled to a refund for July-December.

  2. The fee charged to merchants for debit card transactions is now capped 17 cents (or maybe it’s 12 cents?), so the Banks can no longer afford to pay a fixed percentage of each transaction.

    The discontinuation of mileage earning applies to all Chase cards.

  3. @ Mordy

    You should ask good old Uncle Sam for the refund. Chase, along with every other bank hates these new regulations. Now they will be getting less fees from merchants you shop at which will cost them millions. This act is supposed to cause retailers to lower their prices, yeah…right. To make up for this lost revenue, you’ll soon be paying for things you used to get for free at banks, including all these amazing debit card offers.

    Thanks for nothing dems. 😀

  4. @$%! Glad that I signed up when CO was offering 25K for the card.. I guess I’ll cancel it after July 12th. I can just go to a regular chase debit card, unless UA has a good offer.

  5. Teabaggers like Jim think it’s their god given right for him to receive handouts and subsidies paid for by others. How ironic.

  6. It is not much, but KeyBank offers Onepass miles, 1 mile per $2.00 and 1 mile per $6.00 debit. It also has a sign up bonus of 3500 miles.

    $35.00/year IIRC

    (full disclosure I work for KeyBank)

  7. As with Brian, I have a BofA USAirways debit card with them and am wondering if my card with them will go the same way.

  8. I am glad I opened both the personal and business cards under this offfer, acquired 50K OnePass miles, and then closed the accounts a year later. Now I have to apply for the Chase CO Mastercard with a 50K bonus mile signup offer.

  9. Chase stopped giving me miles on purchases with my CO Debit card (when used as credit) about two months before I canceled the card. SOOO happy to be done with them. ;D

  10. This is absolutely ridiculous. Let’s encourage people to use credit cards for the small purchases, so they won’t notice when their bill is too large to pay, and the banks make even MORE money off of the interest on the unpaid balance. Absolutely ridiculous.

  11. Was the only reason for staying at Chase. Thinking about Citi for AA debit card even though I’m no fan of Citi.

  12. @Tzania,

    As of 7/20/11, I’ve confirmed the following banks still offer debit card airline miles:

    BofA
    SunTrust
    Citi

    It definitely does not apply to all bank debit cards.

  13. Citi has closed the AAdvantage debit cards to new members, and Key Bank is getting rid of it entirely. However, I am still getting CO miles with my First Hawaiian debit card. And according to their website, it is still on offer. Although, if you just link your credit card to your checking account, you can just monitor your spending and don’t spend more than you have. CC’s usually give more miles anyway.
    https://www.fhb.com/continentalchkcrd.htm

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