Wow, I’m such a geek (or thief)….

I tend to be a bit disorganized when it comes to note taking. Almost everything I jot down is on hotel notepads. But I didn’t realize just how bad my collection was. Below is a picture of the eight notepads I’ve written on today. And that’s not even the beginning of my notepad collection (and don’t even ask about my hotel pen collection)….

At least I’m consistent. 😉

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About lucky

Ben Schlappig (aka Lucky) is a travel consultant, blogger, and avid points collector. He travels about 400,000 miles a year, primarily using miles and points to fund his first class experiences. He chronicles his adventures, along with industry news, here at One Mile At A Time.

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Comments

  1. And I bet the hotels were all identically bland as well. The tourist stays at chains. The traveler seeks more character.

  2. @ MoiMoi — I’d like to think that being open-minded is part of being a “traveler.” And I’d also like to think that, by extension, part of being open-minded is avoiding sweeping generalizations. But to each their own….

    I’ve stayed at many InterContinental hotels that I’d say have a LOT of character and I’d also like to think I’ve been exposed to some authentic experiences thanks to their excellent concierge teams.

  3. Of course, “to each their own…” However, that doesn’t change the fact that these are big box hotels and are interchangeable without history, character, or individual style.

    Why one would choose to stay at a big box hotel in individual cities that are often sought out for their character and unique atmosphere (Paris, London, etc.) is likely indicative that, in fact, those cities were merely a notch on one’s belt rather than an experience.

    Of course, much of your travel style of just that: interchangeable and without character. Diet Coke and airline lounge fare in Istanbul, London, Hong Kong, well, it’s all the same. Where’s the experience in that?

    Don’t get me wrong, if that’s what you enjoy, by all means, do it. I’m just pointing out differences in travel styles.

  4. I love qualifications with that.

    Basically, you might as well say “F*&^ your mother” and then qualify that with “oh, interpret that as you wish.”

  5. I like to think I have a world-class collection of ‘do not disturb’ and ‘pls make up room’ door tags! 🙂

  6. Do not disturb signs?

    I’ve never heard of people taking those.

    Thinking about it then, what is the wierdiest thing you have taken from a hotel?

    I’ll be first to admit it was an ethernet cable.

    Hey, they come in useful sometimes!

  7. The key is to get a room with a window that opens ALL the way, and it needs to be on the lowest floor possible (unless you have the benefit of a crane, which can be both costly and impractical). Next, you and a couple of your strong friends simply pull the bathtub out of its secured position within the bathroom. It’s not as difficult as you would imagine (where there’s a will there’s a way). NOTE: This is for entertainment purposes only and does not reflect my past actions or intentions.

  8. Oh, yeah, the hotel swag…I have pads, pens, toiletries (I don’t think I’ve actually bought a bar of soap in a couple of years), and a couple of ashtrays from back in the day when hotels put their logo and phone number on the side and actually wanted you to take them.

    My favourite “do not disturb” tag is the one I have from the Hard Day’s Night hotel in Liverpool, “I’ve had a hard day’s night” on one side, and just “Help!” on the other. Yes, the hotel milks the Beatles theme for all its worth, but the staff is very friendly and the service is quite good.

    @MoiMoi – If you hold Lucky’s travel style in such disdain, why do you read the blog? One of the big themes of the blog is program loyalty and how Lucky uses those programs to his advantage.

    And let’s be honest, at the end of the day, hotel rooms are for sleeping in, they all have the same elements arranged in roughly the same way. It’s what you do outside the room that counts.

    As for the Diet Coke…it’s a caffeine delivery device. Some of us just don’t drink coffee. And not everything on a trip needs to be an “experience”, a beverage is just a beverage.

    Have you ever read “The Backpacker” blog on the Sydney Morning Herald’s website? There’s a recurring theme about the “Travel Wanker”, they type of self-proclaimed “traveler” who goes about bragging about how “unique” and “off the beaten path” and “authentic” his travel experiences are and how mundane the rest of us are. Or, in other words, is a pompous git. You, “MoiMoi” (“Me, Me”…sort of says it all, doesn’t it?) are a Travel Wanker.

  9. Craig: Thanks for the mention of the Backpacker blog. I had never heard of it, and it appears to be very amusing!

  10. @Craig Hmmm… Certainly wouldn’t say any of my travels were “off the beaten path.” Although, if you follow the patterns of Lucky, and obviously you do or you wouldn’t be so defensive, then “off the beaten path” to either of you would roughly translate as any hotel other than an InterContinental and any drink other than a Diet Coke. 😉

    I read the blog to consume different points of view and not to agree with everything I read. Perhaps Lucky only meant for the blog to be read by those whom will agree and happily lap up everything he writes? Like, um, Craig and Eric? No. I doubt it. And I’m assuming the “Comments” section is, well, golly, for just that?

    Apply any labels you want based on information you’ve somehow gleaned from an internet handle. Run with it as that’s likely the only argument you can make. 😉

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